Forensic Psychology Blog





Forensic Psychology Blog


The All About Forensic Psychology Blog will be used to alert readers to all the latest content and resources added to the website.

It will also document a significant person, event or landmark in the history of psychology every day of the year.


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May 03, 2016

British Psychological Society: Today in the History of Psychology (3rd May 1965)



The British Psychological Society's petition for incorporation and governance by royal charter was approved by Queen Elizabeth II. The object of which according to an extract from the charter is 'to promote the advancement and diffusion of a knowledge of psychology pure and applied and especially to promote the efficiency and usefulness of Members of the Society by setting up a high standard of professional education and knowledge.'

Information produced in association with psychology at Penn State.

CLICK HERE For Full Details of Penn State's Online Bachelor's Degree Programs in Psychology.

May 02, 2016

Edgar Arnold Doll: Today in the History of Psychology (2nd May 1889)



Edgar Arnold Doll was born. A pioneer in the field of special education and assessment, Doll's interest in mental deficiency led him to develop the Vineland Social Maturity Scale; a revolutionary instrument designed to provide an objective measure of level of social functioning.

Information produced in association with psychology at Penn State.

CLICK HERE For Full Details of Penn State's Online Bachelor's Degree Programs in Psychology.

May 01, 2016

Emmy von N: Today in the History of Psychology (1st May 1889)



Sigmund Freud began treating one of his most famous patients 'Emmy von N,' later identified as Fanny Moser, an extremely wealthy Swiss philanthropist and patron of the arts. The case of Emmy von N greatly influenced Freud's thinking and writing on 'hysteria,' and is renowned for being the first case where he treated a patient 'to a large extent' using the cathartic method.

Information produced in association with psychology at Penn State.

CLICK HERE For Full Details of Penn State's Online Bachelor's Degree Programs in Psychology.

Apr 30, 2016

Paul Eugen Bleuler: Today in the History of Psychology (30th April 1857)



Paul Eugen Bleuler was born. A pioneer within the field of mental illness, Bleuler coined the term schizophrenia in 1908 during a lecture at a meeting of the German Psychiatric Association in Berlin.

In 1898 Bleuler became director of the Burghölzli (the psychiatric hospital of the University of Zürich, Switzerland.) Among the eminent figures to study under Bleuler at the Burghölzli were Carl Jung, A. A. Brill, Ernest Jones and Karl Abraham.

Apr 29, 2016

Neurasthenia: Today in the History of Psychology (29th April 1869)



The first published account of 'neurasthenia' appeared in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal in an article by George Miller Beard titled 'Neurasthenia, or nervous exhaustion'. This 'new' neurotic disorder - the symptoms of which include mental fatigue, inability to concentrate, dizziness, tension headaches, sleep disturbance and irritability - soon became a highly prevalent diagnosis throughout the U.S, so much so it acquired the nickname "Americanitis."

Although neurasthenia is included as a diagnosis in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, modern day presentation of the symptoms within the disorder are typically reclassified within other more well known psychological diagnoses.

Apr 28, 2016

Ivan Pavlov: Today in the History of Psychology (28th April 1903)



At the 14th International Medical Congress held in Madrid, Ivan Pavlov presented a paper titled 'Experimental Psychology and Psychopathology of Animals.' A true landmark in the history of psychology, this was the first time Pavlov had provided a detailed public account of his groundbreaking theory of conditional reflexes.

Apr 27, 2016

Herbert Spencer: Today in the History of Psychology (27th April 1820)



Herbert Spencer was born. A great thinker of his time and a true polymath, Spencer wrote widely on a range of topics including psychology. In 1855 he published 'Principles of Psychology,' a landmark text in the early days of the discipline embraced by the likes of William James and John Dewey.

Principles of Psychology was profoundly influential in establishing behavior analysis as a major area of study within psychology; as it was within this book that Spencer formulates the principle that behavior changes in adaptation to the environment. This key concept based on evolutionary selectionism would go on to influence the work of such luminaries as Edward Thorndike and B.F. Skinner.