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Forensic Psychology Blog


Forensic Psychology Blog


The All About Forensic Psychology Blog will be used to alert readers to all the latest content and resources added to the website.

It will also document a significant person, event or landmark in the history of psychology every day of the year.




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May 19, 2019

Alfred Adler: Today in the History of Psychology (19th May 1929)




The Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper in New York announces 'Discovered Inferiority Complex' in a headline story about Alfred Adler. This wonderful editorial notes:

'Towering above the whole brood of petty psychologists, mediocre psychologists and even great psychologists, is Dr. Alfred Adler of Vienna...Dr. Adler is the discoverer of the complicated manifestations of the inferiority complex and an international authority on the devious modes of human behavior.'

See following link to learn all about the life and work of psychology legend Alfred Adler.

Alfred Adler

May 18, 2019

Morons, imbeciles, and idiots: Today in the History of Psychology (18th May 1910)




During the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of the Feeble-Minded in Illinois, psychologist Henry H. Goddard proposed adopting the terms moron, imbecile, and idiot as three distinct classes of mental defect.

Now pejorative terms no longer employed in a psychological context, moron, imbecile, and idiot were standard definitions within the field of 'mental retardation' for many years.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

May 17, 2019

Helen Peak: Today in the History of Psychology (17th May 1900)




Helen Peak was born. A highly respected scholar and pioneering researcher, Peak was among the first group of psychologists to undertake precise laboratory measurements during social behavior experiments.

Helen Peak was also renowned for helping to bring together social psychology and individual psychology through her innovative work on attitude structure and attitude change.

See following link to learn about some of the most eminent women in the history of psychology.

Eminent Women in Psychology

May 16, 2019

William Bevan: Today in the History of Psychology (16th May 1922)




William Bevan was born. An influential cognitive psychologist, Bevan is best known for founding the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP). Established to identify and inspire intellectually gifted children, over 2 million students have benefited from the TIP program since its launch in 1980.

Bevan served as president of the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1982 and received the APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest in 1989.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

May 15, 2019

Carl Wernicke: Today in the History of Psychology (15th May 1848)




Carl Wernicke was born. A prodigious talent in the field of neurology, Wernicke published his groundbreaking book 'The Aphasia Symptom Complex' in 1874 at the age of just 26. His revolutionary work on localized brain damage was so influential that the region of the brain associated with neurological connections to language acquisition is known as 'Wernicke's area.'

One of the most outstanding neuroscientists of his time, Wernicke's life was tragically cut short at the age of 56 following a biking accident in June 1905.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

May 14, 2019

William Stephenson: Today in the History of Psychology (14th May 1902)




William Stephenson was born. Trained in both physics and psychology, Stephenson was internationally recognized for his pioneering work in psychometrics and factor analysis.

As a psychologist, Stephenson was best known for developing the 'Q technique,' a methodological approach designed to elicit and measure subjectivity within a scientific framework.

Information via: On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments

May 13, 2019

Edwin Shneidman: Today in the History of Psychology (13th May 1918)




Edwin Shneidman was born. A pioneering psychologist and renowned authority on the study of suicide, in 1958 Shneidman co-founded the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center which became a model around the world for suicide prevention services, training and research.

Shneidman coined the phrase 'psychological autopsy' and helped develop the concept as a method of assisting medical examiners/coroners in cases where cause of death was ambiguous.

In 1987 Shneidman received the American Psychological Association (APA) Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice.

See following link to learn all about the psychological autopsy.

Psychological Autopsy